What Is A Rain Fly On A Tent

A properly staked-out tent will provide you with more interior space and keep the tent walls off your face at night, regardless of whether there is wind or rain in the forecast.

The Different Types Of Rain Flies

What is a full-coverage rainfly, anyway? These are typically utilized by campers who are heading out in high winds and heavy rain.

The reason a full-coverage rain fly is so effective is that it is known to block 99 percent of the wind from entering the tent while assuring that no rainwater enters the tent through the fly.

Half-coverage or partial-coverage rain flies – These are the half-coverage or partial-coverage rain flies. They perform the job, although not nearly as well as the rain flies with complete coverage. (Find the Best 14 Person Tent)

These protect the tent’s most critical portions (the sleeping areas), ensuring you keep dry even if it rains buckets.

However, because they don’t cover the entire tent, you’ll feel the cold from outside a lot more. Therefore extra blankets are essential if you want to make it through the night.

Is it possible to rent a tent with a built-in rainfly?

Yes, some tents come with a built-in rainfly. The rainfly is normally already linked to the tent poles, so no additional setup is required. Thus, this makes it quite simple to set up a waterproof tent in no time. However, having a built-in rainfly has several disadvantages. For starters, you won’t be able to remove the rainfly and increase the amount of circulation within the tent.

tent with rain fly

What Is The Purpose Of A Rain Fly?

Most tents will feature netting at the top to allow heat and moisture to escape through the top the tent. In the summer, your tent would be incredibly stuffy if it didn’t have that mesh. However, if you use netting on the ceiling of your tent, the rain will be able to get inside.

A rain fly is used to protect precipitation from getting inside your tent’s mesh ceiling. Rainfly is attached to the top of your tent and helps keep rainfall out of the interior. Your tent’s rainfly may completely cover or only partially cover the walls of your tent.

If you want the ultimate weather protection, choose a tent with a full-coverage rain fly, which will cover the whole surface of your tent. More so, a rain fly that only partially covers your tent will allow rain to seep through, resulting in water getting through your tent walls.

Normally, the rain fly does not sit directly on your tent. You have some insulation gap between it and the tent, which may help keep your tent cool in hotter temperatures. A rain fly is often included with the purchase of a tent.

Some of these merely cover the top of the tent rather than the entire structure. While these types of rain fly do a good job of shielding against some rain and wind, there may be leaks and temperature dips when the weather becomes more severe.

What’s the best way to set up a rainfly?

The nylon or polyester material, as well as guy lines (long strands of thin rope) and pegs, will be included with your rainfly. Try to find the notches where your guy line ties together to build and set up a rainfly. Tie the guy line’s non-looped side to each notch. Cover your tent with a rainfly. Using stakes, secure each guy line to the ground. (Read Most Comfortable Way To Sleep In A Tent)

rain fly on winter

Is it necessary to use a rain fly in the winter?

If you’re going camping in the winter, I recommend utilizing a rain fly to protect the warm air from your body from entering the tent. More importantly, it will block snow from getting into the top of your tent if you intend on camping in the snow.

Is It Necessary To Have A Rain Fly?

During the summer, you should only use a rain fly if you expect it to rain soon. Because rain flies trap heat that would otherwise escape from the top of your tent, it will be hotter inside your tent in the summer months if the rain fly is removed. If an unexpected pop-up shower comes through, you run the risk of sleeping without a rain fly.

Tent floors are fairly robust and water-resistant, but they will be defeated if there is a lot of rain accumulating below. Furthermore, a footprint not only keeps water out of your tent but also keeps your tent floor from being ripped up.

What Is The Best Way To Put A Rain Fly On A Tent?

You’ve learned about the various varieties of rain flies, the materials they’re made of, and why they’re required. But how do you put a rainfly together? Easy. The nylons or polyester material, guy lines (long strands of thin rope), and stakes will all come with your rainfly.

To assemble and put up a rainfly, follow these steps:

  • Locate the notches where your guy line connects.
  • Tie the guy line’s non-looped side to each notch.
  • Cover your tent with a rainfly.
  • Using stakes, secure each guy line to the ground.
  • Your guy line should have an adjustment to tighten or loosen it. Adjust as needed until the lines are taut (no need to stretch the rainfly, just secure it).

rain fly

What Is The Best Way To Keep Your Tent Dry When It’s Raining?

A full-coverage rainfly is the greatest approach to protect your tent from the rain because it will cover all of your tent’s surfaces. Because of the shape of the tent, you won’t be able to find one with a full-coverage rain fly whether you’re trying to buy a cabin tent or a pop-up tent.

Most tents with full-coverage rain flies are dome-style tents, which make providing full coverage easier. A rain fly would not fit over the walls of a cabin design tent since they are practically vertical. Some tents include a rain fly, which extends the coverage of your main tent. To assist secure it even further, this extra layer may come with its pole(s) or guy lines.

You may also purchase a tarp to place over the top of your rain fly to provide an extra layer of protection from the weather. The tarp may be draped over your tent and staked into the ground. You might also use neighboring trees to hang the tarp over your tent. Both of these ways should keep the interior of your tent dry.

I would also recommend a tent with a vestibule if you want to keep your tent as dry as possible. If you’re unfamiliar with a vestibule, it’s essentially a tent awning that extends off the front of the tent to provide additional rain protection on the front side.

Patching a hole

It can be simply fixed with the use of patching tape for small holes or cuts. Patching tape, seam grip, alcohol rub, and waterproofing spray are all essential items.

The processes are as follows: Clean both sides of the hole/cut by rubbing it with an alcohol solution around it. Note that rubbing more than the needed surface can ruin the waterproofing layer, so be careful. (Learn How To Pack A Tent In A Backpack)

It can be simply fixed with the use of patching tape for small holes or cuts. Patching tape, seam grip, alcohol rub, and waterproofing spray are all essential items. The following are the steps you must take:

  • Clean both sides of the hole/cut by rubbing it with an alcohol solution. Note that rubbing more than the needed surface can ruin the waterproofing layer, so be careful.
  • Place the mending tape on both sides and push and stretch it firmly using your fingers to ensure no air bubbles will be between them.
  • Apply the seam grip to the patch’s edges with care. Make sure the patch and the rainfly are both adequately covered as a general rule. Attempt to cover at least half an inch on both sides.
  • Allow at least 12 hours for the sheet to dry.
  • Recoat the area with a waterproofing coating. Because you can’t be certain that the seam grip has covered all of the spots you’ve previously wiped off, it’s best to reapply the coating to the entire piece.

Final Thoughts

A fly has the added benefit of being extremely light and portable. The disadvantages of flies include the fact that a person can be exposed to some elements, such as mosquitoes and cold weather, and that putting a fly up might be difficult if there are few natural vertical structures in the camping area trees.

Lastly, everything you need to know about tent rain flies and how to use them should be covered in this article.

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